October 2016 - St. Mother Theodore Guerin and St. Isaac Jogues

St. Mother Theodore Guerin and St. Isaac Jogues. Photos: Catholic News Service St. Mother Theodore Guerin and St. Isaac Jogues. Photos: Catholic News Service
St. Mother Theodore Guerin

Immigrant founded oldest U.S. Catholic college for women

1798–1856
Feast: October 3

A Breton by birth, Anne-Therese Guerin was 25 when she entered the Sisters of Providence of Ruille-sur-Loir, France. As Sister Theodore, she directed schools in Rennes and Soulaines, where she also studied pharmacy and medicine. Despite poor health, she led five other nuns across the Atlantic to a new mission on the American Frontier. St. Mary-of-the-Woods Academy, which they began in Indiana, is now the oldest U.S. Catholic college for women. Mother Theodore survived a harsh climate, a major fire and the hostility of the local bishop, also from France, to found the Sisters of Providence of St. Mary-of-the-Woods. Canonized in 2006, she often advised others, “Put yourself gently into the hands of Providence.”

St. Isaac Jogues

North American martyr celebrated Mass with mutilated hands

1607–1646
Feast: October 19

Born in Orleans, France, Isaac joined the Jesuits at a young age and was sent to his order’s North American mission in 1636. He and Rene Goupil were captured and tortured by a band of Iroquois in 1642. Rene was killed and Isaac was held as a slave until his rescue by Dutch settlers. He returned to France, secured permission to continue saying Mass despite mutilated hands, and returned to Canada in 1644. He and John Lalande were tomahawked and beheaded by Huron Indians who invited them to a meal. These three and five others, the North American martyrs, are patron saints of Canada and North America. They share this feast and shrines in New York State and Ontario, Canada.

- Catholic News Service

Northwest Catholic - October 2016